Friday, 24 November 2017

4 Ways You Can Prepare Financially for Self-Employment

Budgeting TIps


With the new year around the corner, I know I’m going to receive tons of emails from readers who want to quit their day jobs in 2018. They are going to ask about how they can prepare financially in order to take the leap into full-time self-employment.


Well, I know all about that because I quit my last day job four years ago. Being that I was far more risk averse back then, there are certain things I did to prepare financially. These things also seem to be pretty common across the board as I ask colleagues what they did to prepare.


Make sure you have some money coming in from a business already.


If you don’t already have a business that is bringing in some money, don’t quit your job. In order to prepare financially, it would be nice if you already have some sort of income from your business.


Trust me, if you quit without having money coming in already, you will be right back at a day job in a matter of a few months. Additionally, you wouldn’t want to quit without knowing that you have a viable business idea that you can grow over time.


In my case, I already had money coming in from some freelance writing and coaching. I knew that my job was simply getting in the way of being able to grow my business. That’s a far better position to be in than to quit without a game plan.


Make sure you have some savings in the bank.


Speaking from experience, the first couple of years of business are typically rough. That’s why in order to prepare financially for self-employment, you’ll want to make sure you have some savings in the bank.


Because I’d been making money on the side for some time, I was putting all of that money into savings for that moment when I finally quit. It came in handy that first year of full-time self-employment.


Pay off your consumer debt.


You know what debt does? It keeps you from living the way you want. As a couple of my coaching clients, The Debt Free Guys, say “Credit card debt ties your money to the past.”


It will be much easier to take the leap into full-time self-employment if you pay off your debt. That way you free up some money. There’s also less pressure in terms of bills.


Granted, I’m only speaking of consumer debt like credit cards because they serve absolutely no purpose. Obviously, things like student loans and a mortgage are a bit of a different story. In those cases, make sure you have enough coming in to continue paying off those debts.


Keep your expenses low.


In order for me to prepare financially to have quit my job, I made sure to have insanely low living expenses. I lived with family, never bought a car and rarely spent money on myself when I was getting a business off the ground.


Does it suck to do these things? Yes. But it’s absolutely worth it in the end. Because I did this to prepare financially, I am now able to live the way I always wanted to with room to grow.



Source: B2C

Straightforward Formula to Increase Your Revenue by 1000%.

aroblesgalit / Pixabay


You know you have to build income. Be that as it may, express “increment income” on your plan for the day and I’d wagered that you never get around to it. The issue will crush you before you ever truly begin. What’s more, in that lies your genuine situation: Where do you begin? What levers would you be able to draw to raise your primary concern? Is there a Straightforward Formula to Increase Your Revenue by 1000%.


On the off chance that you’ll enable me to make a concise reroute back to secondary school math, I’ll demonstrate you. To get your brain around it, here’s a basic equation:


(#*%*$)/t ~ Revenue


Alright, it doesn’t look all that straightforward, however it is. We should separate it:


  • # = The quantity of leads you get every month.

  • % = The transformation rate of arrangements into exchanges. For instance, if 100 individuals call you, and out of those, 10 purchase, your change rate is 10%.

  • $ = The normal sum you gather from a client in a solitary exchange.

  • t = The normal measure of time it takes to settle every transaction.

  • ~ (squiggly fellow) = This image shows a corresponding relationship.

  • Revenue = The sum your business pipeline produces every month.

What does the majority of this mean?


On the off chance that you recall Algebra class, by expanding factors in the numerator or diminishing factors in the denominator of a portion, you will wind up with a bigger number. Additionally, on the off chance that you have a number that is relative to income and that number expands, so does your income. Along these lines, on the off chance that you can increment #, $, or %, you increment incomes; in like manner, in the event that you can diminish t you can expand incomes. Goodness, and the truly cool thing here is that on the off chance that you can roll out little positive improvements to each of these factors you are basically utilizing the “Compound Effect”.


An illustration:


Suppose you’re a business expert. You get 40 drives every month, and you pitch to two of them. Your normal deal is $5,000 and it takes you 10 hours to make it happen. Units aside (to improve), your recipe would be (40*5%*5,000)/10 which gives you the enchantment number of 1,000.


Presently, suppose you increment leads by 10 (25%), enhance your end proportion from 5% to 10%, up your normal exchange measure from $5,000 to $6,250, and diminish the time you have to bring home the bacon from 10 hours to 7.5 hours (25%). Your enchantment number is currently around 4,167, which means an income increment of around 400%. The compound impact at work!


So how would you enhance every one?


Number of leads


Increasing leads isn’t simple. For my Web plan business, Ciplex, we concentrated on ensuring that each site we worked for our customers incorporated a credit that connected back to us. At the point when individuals saw the immense locales we constructed and pondered who made them, they had a simple approach to get in touch with us. That is only a little open door. Contingent upon your business, you can attempt an assortment of showcasing strategies, from trade-shows and customary promoting to SEO, PPC, web-based social networking, and informal advertising.


Transformation rate


Your errand here is to show signs of improvement drives, actualize a superior pre-qualification round, advance your site for change, and enhance your business procedure and pitch. To build change rates at Ciplex, we concentrated on preparing our colleagues to enhance their item learning. Rather than salesmen, they moved toward becoming advisors, working with the customer to decide the best answer for their business. Customers adored that and we saw our change rate bounce therefore.


Normal arrangement size


Can you enhance your item quality, offer more in an exchange, or take a stab at bringing higher ticket things into your item/benefit bundle? Be cautious with this one as it doesn’t generally bode well to raise your costs. We forgot this one at Ciplex, as we needed to remain aggressive, and the market didn’t give us much space to build estimating.


Normal time to close a deal


There’s not a viable alternative for incredible sales representatives and engaging them with awesome frameworks, apparatuses, learning, and procedures to take care of business right. Similarly as we saw our change rate increment when we concentrated on preparing our group, we likewise observed the normal time to let the big dog eat go down.


The ultimate objective is to separate income age into particular, quantifiable activity things. By rolling out little improvements to every factor you can compound development in your income streams and increment the throughput of arrangements through your pipeline. When you get your income to where you need it, your concentration should move to augmenting net revenues (without relinquishing qualify) to really scale your business.



Source: B2C

Joss Whedon Directing And Writing Harry Potter And The Cursed Child Is Fake News

harrypotter-deathlyhallows-epilogue-hug-700x350


Joss Whedon being announced to write and direct “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” is fake news. There is no truth to a tweet from a fake Variety social media account that the director behind The Avengers is taking on the task to helm the latest book from J.K. Rowling for the big screen.


Where did this fake news originate? Spoof account @VarietyFilm posted that Whedon had been hired to write and direct a movie adaptation of the hit play, with the original cast to reprise their roles and linking to the supposed full story.




However, there is no truth to that story. Rather, those fans who clicked the link were directed to the music video for Rick Astley’s huge earworm. Earlier this year, Rowling had to deny speculation that there would be a movie trilogy of Cursed Child, starring the original cast members Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint. Fans were not crazy about that idea on social media.


Whedon is currently still at work on the script for “Batgirl” and remains attached to direct as well. The untitled Batgirl movie is based on the Batgirl story that was first unveiled in DC Comics in 1967.


Here are some reactions on social media to the fake news that Whedon was directing Cursed Child.














Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is a two-part West End stage play written by Jack Thorne based on an original new story by Thorne, J.K. Rowling and John Tiffany.


Previews of the play began at the Palace Theatre, London on 7 June 2016, and it was scheduled to officially premiere on 30 July 2016. The rehearsal script, not a novelisation of the play, was released on 31 July 2016 and became the eighth story set in the Harry Potter universe. The story is set nineteen years after the events of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and follows Harry Potter, now a Ministry of Magic employee, and his younger son Albus Severus Potter.


What did you think of the fake news that Whedon was directing Cursed Child? Did you believe the fake news or see people sharing it falsely on social media? Let us know in the comments section.


Photo Credit: Warner Bros.



Source: B2C

Optimize Your Sales This Holiday With These Marketing Ideas

Christmas holidays are fast-approaching! Take some time to map out your holiday marketing and you’ll be able to optimize your sales this holiday and make it the best season yet! To help with the planning, here are some ideas:


Holiday Specials


Attract customers and incentivize with specials like BOGO, percentage discount, holiday sale coupon codes, and more. You can create paid ads and share these specials with new audiences that fit your target market. This is a great way to extend the reach of your holiday campaign and attract new customers.


Plan for the Last Minute Rush


Offer rush shipping for last minute shoppers! Promote the last possible day they can make orders to ensure they get their package for Christmas. Promote this date before Christmas with your gift-giving guide to make their shopping a little easier.


Gift-Giving Guide


Create the ultimate gift-giving guide to spark some inspiration in your customers. You can make a list of top sellers, top gifts under a price level and specialized guides for everyone on the Christmas list from your Dad, Mom, brother, sister, dog, coworker, and more!


Christmas Gifts


Celebrate the Holidays on Social


Change your cover photos and display pictures across profiles so they shout holidays! Create images to promote best-selling holiday items across social profiles. Link call to actions in your posts to encourage customers to follow your links to an item or deal. This is a great way to promote your gift guide.


Run a Remarketing Campaign


Were customers already on your website? Reach out to them again with a customized remarketing ad. This is also a great way to reach people that abandoned their cart. You can remarket with a freebie or a discount code to encourage them to finish their order. Find out more about remarketing here.


Start an Email Campaign


Send out a holiday newsletter to promote everything you have going on this holiday season whether its specials, featured products and services, Santa pictures, and more! Use catching subject lines and provide value inside the email like a limited time coupon code, a one day bargain of 20% off and more! If you use Google Analytics on your website and MailChimp for email campaigns, you can add Google Analytics tracking to your MailChimp campaign. This will allow you to track clicks from your campaign all the way to purchases on your website.


A Gift That’s Already Wrapped


Help your customers save time and offer a gift-wrapping add-on. They’ll appreciate receiving a gift that’s all ready to put under the tree. Bonus, it may look so good they want to snap a picture and post to social! Add in a customized tag so the customer can write to and from and on the back put your website and social handles. Encourage the gift-receiver to snap a photo and post it online with your company’s hashtag.


Christmas Gift Tag


Host a Holiday Event


Celebrate the holidays with your customers by throwing a party! This could be a special customer appreciation shopping night with giveaways or discounts. Make a Facebook event to promote the event and promote it across channels.


Freebie When You Spend a Certain Amount


Get customers to spend more money on your website by offering a freebie, free shipping, bundle deal or discount when they spend a certain amount. You can also give them a coupon code to redeem at a later date to encourage future buying.



Source: B2C

3 Important Web Pages Every Website Needs

JuralMin / Pixabay


If you have a business today, you need a website. No ifs, ands, or buts about it. But simply having a website isn’t enough to compete in today’s crowded online marketplace. When a new visitor arrives at your website, what should they do first? What steps should they take to hire and do business with you? Unless it is blatantly obvious, many web users will spend just a few moments at your site before moving on.


If you really want to capture their attention, it is important to make the site user friendly and easy to navigate. Easy navigation means giving users an ability to find out what you do, how you do it, and get ahold of you very easily. These three important web pages make it possible.


About


The first page most visitors look for if they want to learn more about your site is the about page. According to KoMarketing, once on a company’s homepage, 52% of visitors want to see “about us” information next. 86% will look for this information on the homepage. If you don’t have it already front and center, make sure the about link is easy to find in the navigation bar at the top of the screen.


But it isn’t just having an about page that is important. Your about page should start a conversation with a user that focuses more on them than you. That may be a bit counter intuitive, but once you think about how most people use web pages in general it makes a lot of sense. Visitors to your site need to be sold on “what’s in it for me” to convert them to a customer. So while your about page should explain who you and your company are and why you should be trusted, the actual about page experience is all about the user.


One 0f the most thoughtful about page experiences I have come across is Derek Halpern’s about page at Social Triggers. His page is ordered in a way that shows of his expertise and tells users what to expect before getting into the “about Derek” information. He puts the readers first and himself second, which does a great job converting those web users into regular readers and eventually customers.


Contact


Many websites simply put an email contact form, phone number, and maybe a Google map with directions on their contact pages. However, that is leaving big opportunities on the table. Of course, you want your about page to be incredibly simple. It should be obvious how customers and potential customers can get ahold of you, but you can do more with your contact page than receive customer service emails.


My contact page gives easy options to reach me via email, but before anyone finds my contact form, they see how to hire me as a freelance writer or speaker before getting to the free reasons someone may want to reach out. While I’m happy to help out readers and answer media inquiries, the first goal of my online business is earning money, and the number one way I earn money is freelance writing. Giving people an option to reach out to hire me first has put real dollars in my pocket.


Of course, every business does not sell via one-on-one client communications. But no matter what method you use to earn, make it incredibly easy for visitors to hire you or give you money. Of any important web pages, the ones that get you paid are the most important.


Start Here


A newer trend in website development is the start here page. One of the best examples of a start here page is at Smart Passive Income, the popular entrepreneurship site from Pat Flynn. Pat’s start here page does much of what Derek Halpern does with his about page at Social Triggers, but with his own flair and style. And at Smart Passive Income, the start here page takes readers on a different path than the about page.


Pat’s start here page tells users what Smart Passive Income is all about, what to expect, and funnels visitors into one of two paying products or his email list. Paid offerings, his affiliate link for Bluehost and his own Smart Podcast Player for podcasters, are the first two places users are encouraged to click. Below that, users can sign up for the email lists for opportunities at a later conversion. But you’ll notice, he makes it easier to sign up for something that eventually makes him money than anything else. That’s what a start here page should do.


Go Fix Your Site


Does your website have the most important web pages for new visitors to learn about you and become a customer? If not, what are you waiting for? If you have your own website, you should be able to quickly and easily edit your site to meet your needs. Don’t have a website? Check out my guide with a video showing how to get your own .com website up and running in under five minutes.



Source: B2C

Scrum is Often a Waste of Money

The Intent of Scrum


Scrum allows development organisations to invest a little time at regular intervals to allow teams with autonomy over their work to identify and enact frequent, small improvements to the process and the plan. Over time, like regular payments into a savings account, these improvements build up and are compounded to produce high returns in the form of a mature, responsive team, building a relevant and valuable product. To achieve this, time is allocated at regular intervals to inspect and adapt the plan for the sprint; day; and release, and to improve the process:


Week schedule


This is not free: taking a whole team away from their work for several hours a month is an overhead. The Scrum framework caps the time allocated to sprint planning, daily scrums, reviews, and retrospectives at 20 hours for a 4 week sprint (proportionally less for shorter sprints) which represents just over 12% of the entire development effort. It is also suggested that up to 10% of the capacity for the whole team may be spent refining future product backlog items so that they are well understood. These timings are maximums and in practice the actual time spent is likely to be less, but nonetheless the time all adds up:


Schedule


If done well, this investment pays off. New teams quickly identify and correct obvious problems, while mature teams keep themselves sharp and push the boundaries of their technical and collaborative practices. Release plans are put together quickly without undue commitment to delivering “on time, on budget” or solving all of the technical uncertainties up-front; freeing teams to make decisions at the last responsible moment and constantly re-adjust the plan to optimise value.


The reality of Scrum half-implemented


The trouble is, there is often very little attention paid to the effectiveness of these events. Ask yourself the following questions:


  • What was the last tangible improvement to arise from a retrospective?

  • How often do sprint reviews result in a revised release plan, ideas for more valuable features, or any form of change arising from new information that has come to light?

  • During the daily scrum, are the development team truly in control of their plan for the sprint; taking pro-active steps if the plan is not going as expected?

You don’t have the answers?


If you struggle to find answers to these questions, then it is likely the time you are spending implementing basic Scrum practices is a waste of money. We’ve observed the following common issues getting in the way:


  1. Split accountability – meaning no single person is accountable for the present situation.

  2. Issues with your process come up time and time again, but the team has no authority or budget to resolve them.

  3. Business representatives are distant and/or stuck in traditional a project management mind set.

  4. Product owners are either constantly over-ruled and lack authority; or are senior enough to make decisions but busy running an entire department.

  5. Development teams are not trusted to own the technical implementation and, as a result, feel less accountable for organising themselves.

  6. Backlog items are regularly carried over from one sprint to the next with no questions asked, and there are no feedback loops to improve forecasting during sprint planning.

Chart


The common trend in all of the above is a lack of belief at all levels of the organization in the agile principles that underpin Scrum. Most organizations undertake an agile transformation with Scrum in order to gain competitive advantage, but unless the whole development organization embrace the principles and not just the practices, then the results could be worse than before you started. Time spent in Scrum events, combined with the challenge of working in teams of mixed specialisms, will reduce staff utilization without enabling positive change:


What to do next?


Option 1: Give up.


Accept the fact that agility in not a good fit for your organization, at least for now. In your conversation with the senior leadership team you may not convince them to accept fundamental principles – such as the advantages of responding to change over following a rigid plan. If this is the case, it would be more transparent and fair to the people doing the work to carry on with the established project management framework.


Option 2: Fully commit.


Organise a means of getting the Scrum team(s) together with the business and re-establish a sense of purpose. Ask questions like “should we be doing Scrum?” and if so, identify the drivers for achieving an agile capability that are specific to your organization. Once a sense of renewed purpose has been established, the proper execution of the Scrum framework provides a foundation for addressing all of the problems outlined above.


How to make it work: Build a culture of positive accountability


At the heart of the Scrum framework are three roles, each with very clear accountabilities. A culture of positive accountability is built on a foundation of trust and respect; allowing people to challenge each other productively without blame. As a result, pointless meetings and long-term inefficiencies have nowhere to hide. Here’s how you can contribute to establishing such a culture:


Scrum Master


If you are a Scrum Master, you are accountable for managing the process and should feel empowered to draw attention to poorly performing elements.


  • Make sources of apathy or disengagement visible and don’t allow people to avoid discussing awkward problems.

  • Facilitate regular retrospectives to allow all elements of the process to be called into question and improved.

Product Owner


If you are a Product Owner, you are accountable for maximising the value of the product.


  • Start by developing a clear vision and strategy for what your product should be and what outcomes you want to achieve in the medium-long term.

  • Do not accept anything that is getting in the way of realising this vision.

  • Hold your Scrum Master to account if the process is not supporting your ability to capitalise on market opportunities.

  • Hold your Development Team to account if you are not getting good engagement from them. You should expect a collaborative relationship with good quality technical options, reasonably accurate forecasts (depending on size and complexity) and a professional approach to software quality.

Developer


If you are a Developer, you are accountable for building valuable, high-quality software.


  • If you are not sure why a feature is valuable, ask your Product Owner to explain the business context and hold them to account if you feel something hasn’t been thought through.

  • Push back with the support of your Scrum Master if you come under pressure to cut quality to hit short-term deadlines.

  • If you see one of your team-mates cutting corners, hold each other to account within the team. Try to create a sense of pride and ownership in the product you build.

Leader


If you are a leader, you are accountable for the culture you promote and the outcomes that arise from it.


  • Make it clear what you expect from people, and give authority and autonomy to the people that are accountable.

  • Ensure that everyone has the support, training and opportunity to grow into their new roles.

  • Demonstrate the behaviours that you want to encourage in your team such as openness and respect, while holding yourself and others to account.

It is likely that it will take time to achieve high performance. Building a great team, just like building a great product, is best achieved in small, incremental stages.


Scrum half-implemented in not an option!



Source: B2C

Thursday, 23 November 2017

Scrum is Often a Waste of Money

The Intent of Scrum


Scrum allows development organisations to invest a little time at regular intervals to allow teams with autonomy over their work to identify and enact frequent, small improvements to the process and the plan. Over time, like regular payments into a savings account, these improvements build up and are compounded to produce high returns in the form of a mature, responsive team, building a relevant and valuable product. To achieve this, time is allocated at regular intervals to inspect and adapt the plan for the sprint; day; and release, and to improve the process:


Week schedule


This is not free: taking a whole team away from their work for several hours a month is an overhead. The Scrum framework caps the time allocated to sprint planning, daily scrums, reviews, and retrospectives at 20 hours for a 4 week sprint (proportionally less for shorter sprints) which represents just over 12% of the entire development effort. It is also suggested that up to 10% of the capacity for the whole team may be spent refining future product backlog items so that they are well understood. These timings are maximums and in practice the actual time spent is likely to be less, but nonetheless the time all adds up:


Schedule


If done well, this investment pays off. New teams quickly identify and correct obvious problems, while mature teams keep themselves sharp and push the boundaries of their technical and collaborative practices. Release plans are put together quickly without undue commitment to delivering “on time, on budget” or solving all of the technical uncertainties up-front; freeing teams to make decisions at the last responsible moment and constantly re-adjust the plan to optimise value.


The reality of Scrum half-implemented


The trouble is, there is often very little attention paid to the effectiveness of these events. Ask yourself the following questions:


  • What was the last tangible improvement to arise from a retrospective?

  • How often do sprint reviews result in a revised release plan, ideas for more valuable features, or any form of change arising from new information that has come to light?

  • During the daily scrum, are the development team truly in control of their plan for the sprint; taking pro-active steps if the plan is not going as expected?

You don’t have the answers?


If you struggle to find answers to these questions, then it is likely the time you are spending implementing basic Scrum practices is a waste of money. We’ve observed the following common issues getting in the way:


  1. Split accountability – meaning no single person is accountable for the present situation.

  2. Issues with your process come up time and time again, but the team has no authority or budget to resolve them.

  3. Business representatives are distant and/or stuck in traditional a project management mind set.

  4. Product owners are either constantly over-ruled and lack authority; or are senior enough to make decisions but busy running an entire department.

  5. Development teams are not trusted to own the technical implementation and, as a result, feel less accountable for organising themselves.

  6. Backlog items are regularly carried over from one sprint to the next with no questions asked, and there are no feedback loops to improve forecasting during sprint planning.

Chart


The common trend in all of the above is a lack of belief at all levels of the organization in the agile principles that underpin Scrum. Most organizations undertake an agile transformation with Scrum in order to gain competitive advantage, but unless the whole development organization embrace the principles and not just the practices, then the results could be worse than before you started. Time spent in Scrum events, combined with the challenge of working in teams of mixed specialisms, will reduce staff utilization without enabling positive change:


What to do next?


Option 1: Give up.


Accept the fact that agility in not a good fit for your organization, at least for now. In your conversation with the senior leadership team you may not convince them to accept fundamental principles – such as the advantages of responding to change over following a rigid plan. If this is the case, it would be more transparent and fair to the people doing the work to carry on with the established project management framework.


Option 2: Fully commit.


Organise a means of getting the Scrum team(s) together with the business and re-establish a sense of purpose. Ask questions like “should we be doing Scrum?” and if so, identify the drivers for achieving an agile capability that are specific to your organization. Once a sense of renewed purpose has been established, the proper execution of the Scrum framework provides a foundation for addressing all of the problems outlined above.


How to make it work: Build a culture of positive accountability


At the heart of the Scrum framework are three roles, each with very clear accountabilities. A culture of positive accountability is built on a foundation of trust and respect; allowing people to challenge each other productively without blame. As a result, pointless meetings and long-term inefficiencies have nowhere to hide. Here’s how you can contribute to establishing such a culture:


Scrum Master


If you are a Scrum Master, you are accountable for managing the process and should feel empowered to draw attention to poorly performing elements.


  • Make sources of apathy or disengagement visible and don’t allow people to avoid discussing awkward problems.

  • Facilitate regular retrospectives to allow all elements of the process to be called into question and improved.

Product Owner


If you are a Product Owner, you are accountable for maximising the value of the product.


  • Start by developing a clear vision and strategy for what your product should be and what outcomes you want to achieve in the medium-long term.

  • Do not accept anything that is getting in the way of realising this vision.

  • Hold your Scrum Master to account if the process is not supporting your ability to capitalise on market opportunities.

  • Hold your Development Team to account if you are not getting good engagement from them. You should expect a collaborative relationship with good quality technical options, reasonably accurate forecasts (depending on size and complexity) and a professional approach to software quality.

Developer


If you are a Developer, you are accountable for building valuable, high-quality software.


  • If you are not sure why a feature is valuable, ask your Product Owner to explain the business context and hold them to account if you feel something hasn’t been thought through.

  • Push back with the support of your Scrum Master if you come under pressure to cut quality to hit short-term deadlines.

  • If you see one of your team-mates cutting corners, hold each other to account within the team. Try to create a sense of pride and ownership in the product you build.

Leader


If you are a leader, you are accountable for the culture you promote and the outcomes that arise from it.


  • Make it clear what you expect from people, and give authority and autonomy to the people that are accountable.

  • Ensure that everyone has the support, training and opportunity to grow into their new roles.

  • Demonstrate the behaviours that you want to encourage in your team such as openness and respect, while holding yourself and others to account.

It is likely that it will take time to achieve high performance. Building a great team, just like building a great product, is best achieved in small, incremental stages.


Scrum half-implemented in not an option!



Source: B2C