Saturday, 19 August 2017

The Digital Transformation Battle Between Sales & Marketing


Did you know that 39% of organisations say that digital transformations have helped them generate real-time sales online?


A further 32% say that a digital transformation has improved operational efficiency, and 28% say it has helped them acquire new customers.


Since the start of 2014, I have been going through a digital transformation.


Whilst I still use the same forms of online and offline marketing including networking, events, email marketing, PPC, and social media, I have understood more from my audience what works for them, and have changed the way I connect with them. I have also understood the importance of podcasting, video and live streaming have made this a huge part in the way I run remarketing campaigns on native platforms.


When I launched my online training business, I realized that I was not getting the traffic I wanted, nor expected. Because of this drop in traffic, I decided to work with a number of influencers and turned my website into an invaluable asset. A website is always a working process, but with just a few tweaks around my CRO (conversation rate optimization) that has helped my digital transformation and user journey, and the way I position myself online, I have found that my website has vastly improved in all aspects.


Going through a digital transformation is something that is being implemented by both small businesses, and larger corporation. By the end of 2017, 75% of CEO’s of global 2000 companies will have a digital transformation as the center focus of their corporate strategy.


What Is A Digital Transformation?


A Digital transformation is what a business will go through when looking at improving, and achieving success through their sales and marketing activities. Going through this transformation means that you, as a business, understand the opportunities between the team, and the technology available to accelerate the impact your brand can have across multiple touchpoints and then building a strategy to approach this.


Why Should You Go Through A Digital Transformation?


Going through a digital transformation means that you are meeting your business growth challenges head-on, and understanding your customers needs, technology available and all of the moving parts a successful business should be aware of. In doing this, you will better understand the opportunities available to you as a business online, and also give your brand the best chance to succeed.


The difficulty with going through a digital transformation is looking at what needs to be achieved in both sales, and marketing. Historically, sales and marketing have battled against each other. On one hand, sales is economic, and on the other hand, marketing is cultural.


So, let’s take a look at the impact going through a digital transformation will have on sales, and then on marketing.


The Impact On Sales


Going through a digital transformation will give you a competitive advantage when it comes to generating sales for your business.


Having that shift in your business means that you are giving yourself, and your employees the chance to access better data, and better ways to process this data because the technology you are using are more advanced, and up-to-date. With having better data, comes better selling techniques and democratises the access to information, and decision making, meaning from a sales point of view, you can be more productive.


To give you an example, one of my most recent Warren Knight blogs was all about AI (Artificial Intelligence) and machine learning, and how this is being applied to businesses to become more sales efficient. Having access to AI will provide you with ways in which you can effectively sell your products/services.


The Impact on Marketing


The online world demands real-time, on-demand and attention grabbing content. Sales is one thing, but marketing both pre, and post sale is even more important because of the way consumers want to connect with businesses online.


Going through a digital transformation will heavily impact your marketing strategy in a positive way. Imagine if you could generate a better ROI and ROE on your marketing by actually speaking with your customers, and not just speaking at them.


Offering great customer service as a part of your marketing is something that can only be done with real effect if you are engaging, developing loyalty, and most importantly; understanding what the customer needs, and going through a digital transformation will help you achieve this.


Marketing used to be like throwing a dart at a dartboard, and hoping to hit bulls-eye. We no longer have to guess, and hope that something will work. We have the technology to KNOW what will work, and how to achieve the best possible outcome.


We can now do things in marketing because we can analyse the data in real-time and engage in real-time.


Moving Forward


Looking to the future, for your digital transformation to be as successful as possible you need to forget about a battle between sales and marketing and both combine, and integrate all of your marketing with your sales processes.


I have found that, by understanding the type of marketing that works for my audience, I can then reach my sales goals, and understand how to build the customer retention, and brand advocacy post-sale.


Are you going to go through a digital transformation and if so, what is the first thing you are going to do?



Source: B2C

5 Popular Marketing ChatBots To Complement Your Sales & Marketing Team

5 Popular Marketing ChatBots To Complement Your Sales & Marketing Team


Welcome to the Future of Online Marketing


Artificial Intelligence is Making Great Strides in the World of Online MarketingThe age of artificial intelligence has arrived, but it looks a little different than what we predicted. Bots are showing up everywhere to use their automated technology to perform simple tasks. They have the ability to interact with humans and respond to requests so employees don’t have to.


What Are Marketing Bots?


Marketing ‘chatbots’ are integrated into messaging interfaces such as Slack and Facebook Messenger as a way to answer product-related questions. Rather than customers using email, which can have a long response time, or calling a help customer service line, which can be limited to certain hours, chatbots offer immediate answers to real customer questions. The bots can then collect data from each interaction, which can be used to gain insight into consumer behavior.


Chatbot marketing san diego California bloominari

Who Uses Marketing Bots?

Marketing bots are typically used by service-oriented companies wanting to quickly respond to customer inquiries. This includes travel companies and ecommerce sites, but bots can be utilized by just about any business with customers. Take a look at the time and resources spent on customer communication in your company. You might benefit from one of these top chatbots.


The Best Bots in Marketing


1.ManyChat


If your business has an active Facebook page, ManyChat can help you create a chatbot that instantly responds to Facebook messages. You can send welcome messages and set up keyword auto-responses as well as schedule posts on your page. It takes about two minutes to set up your bot and no coding is required.


ManyChat allows you to beat out the cluttered newsfeed by targeting right to your subscribers. Whenever someone chats with your ManyChat Facebook messenger chatbot, they will automatically become a subscriber. The subscriber list can then be used to broadcast news and updates to everyone.


2. Motion.Ai


Motion AI claims to be the most powerful bot in the industry. What makes this bot stand out is its amazing visual interface to easily setup and build your chatbot. If you can visualize and draw your ideal chatbot diagram and flowchart, then you’ll be able to easily launch your bot within minutes rather than hours. This bot even comes with it’s own bot store, the app store for bot templates and apps to help you get started even quicker. Best of all, you can start to use it for free to build up to 2 bots and use up to 1,000 messages.


3. SurveyBot


Like ManyChat, SurveyBot works through the Facebook Messenger interface. Create marketing surveys and get useful answers through messaging. You can choose from over 12 question types to ensure you ask the right questions. The bot uses answer piping, conversational logic, and re-engagement to act almost like a real human. Also like ManyChat, you can collect information from subscribers and analyze the survey results. Surveys can build lead generation, so the SurveyBot is a great tool to reach potential customers.


survey chatbot marketing customer services san diego agency


4. Assist


Used by some of the biggest customer service oriented companies like Hyatt, 1-800 Flowers and Fandango, Assist offers personal assistance to power all types of conversation platforms. The fast-working program strays away from pre-defined scripts for a more flexible experience. The natural language processing and machine learning capabilities of Assist create a more realistic interaction for the user.


5. Mr. Chatbot


Specifically designed for eCommerce, Mr. Chatbot uses the typical Facebook Messenger chatbot techniques to drive sales through AI interactions. Simply create a bot for your ecommerce site’s Facebook page using the Mr. Chatbot program. Users can interact with the bot and it will respond within seconds using natural language. Once users have interacted with the bot, they will be signed up to receive special promotions and news straight to their messenger app.


Real Chatbot Business Example: A Chatbot that Sells Roses


Yes, you read that right. Ever thought that a chatbot would be able to sell flowers for your company online? Without you having to speak to a human to order your Valentine’s day sweetheart roses? Well, a partner agency we work with did just that. They built a chatbot that allows you to buy roses through Facebook messenger, and place the entire order through it.


How to benefit from using a Chatbot


Chatbots are taking marketing communication into the future with basic AI technology. You could benefit from one of these favorite chatbots if your company spends a lot of time responding to basic inquiries, especially on social media. To generate more leads and reduce customer response time, consider using a chatbot for your Facebook page.


How to start your first Chatbot


The first step is to be open to testing new things and be willing to take a risk. Chatbots are still pretty new, and people and businesses are still in the beginning stages of trying to figure out how to best integrate chatbots into their online marketing strategy. We suggest that you create an account with any of the free chatbot systems, poke around, and start building a chatbot for something as simple as greeting all of your new Facebook messenger subscribers, or anyone who chooses to send you a message through your Facebook page.



Source: B2C

15 Email Personalization Stats That Might Surprise You

Email personalization is a tactic used by many marketers today. Of course, they’re doing it for a good reason.


Long gone are the days of one-size-fits-all messaging. Instead, modern marketers are striving to leverage personalization in emails that feel like they are custom-made for the individual.


Personalized emails…


  • …stand out within the inbox as highly relevant, tailor-made material.

  • …make an email more likely to be opened and clicked on.

  • …strengthen customer experiences by sending the right content to the right people at the right time.

This is just the tip of the iceberg when you look at the benefits of email personalization. Today, marketers are going far beyond leveraging subscribers’ first names– they’re working hard to find ways to use smart, relevant email marketing to create new opportunities.


But don’t just take our word for it. Check out some of these email personalization stats that might surprise you. Take a look at the numbers we’ve collected to see how important this approach is within the modern email setting.


Email personalization stats


These 15 email personalization stats help tie some hard numbers to the buzz around email personalization. No matter how you slice it, personalization is helping boost the success of email marketing strategies across a wide array of industries.


1) Sixty-six percent of marketers are working toward securing internal resources to execute personalized marketing programs. – Conversant Media


2) Personalized email messages improve click-through rates by an average of 14% and conversions by 10%. – Aberdeen


3) When asked to prioritize one capability that will be most important to marketing in the future, 33% of marketers answered: “personalization.” – Adage


4) 74% of marketers say targeted personalization increases customer engagement. – eConsultancy


5) Only 39% of online retailers send personalized product recommendations via email. – Certona


6) Emails with personalized subject lines are 26% more likely to be opened. – Campaign Monitor


7) Personalized emails deliver 6x higher transaction rates. – Experian


8) 53% of marketers say ongoing, personalized communication with existing customers results in moderate to significant revenue impact. – DemandGen


9) 94% of customer insights and marketing professionals across multiple industries said personalization is “important,” “very important,” or “extremely important” for meeting their current email marketing objectives. – Conversant Media


10) Segmented and targeted emails generate 58% of all revenue. – DMA


11) Marketers have noted a 760% increase in revenue from segmented campaigns. – Campaign Monitor


12) Marketers see an average increase of 20% in sales when using personalized experiences. – Monetate


13.) 50% of companies feel they can increase interaction within email by increasing personalization. – Experian


14) Some brands have recorded 8x improvement on click-through rates with a personalized video versus standard outbound email campaigns. – Marketing Land


15) The open rate for emails with a personalized message was 18.8%, as compared to 13.1% without any personalization in 2016. – Statista


Email personalization tips


Now that you have some compelling stats about email personalization let’s look at a few specific tips for how you can immediately incorporate personalization into your email efforts.


1. Leverage dynamic content.


Dynamic content allows you to determine who sees what content for each block of content within an email. Essentially, that means you can show different email content to different segments or lists for a specific campaign, as seen in the example below.

Using Campaign Monitor, you can create multiple versions of the same email that’s personalized for different sets of subscribers based on the information you have about them (like whether they’re male or female, their purchase history, etc.)


Bonus: You can do this without having to create a new email every time– it’s all done within a single campaign.


Campaign Monitor – Email Marketing - Dynamic Content


2. Harness the power of integrations.


By integrating your email platform with other sources of subscriber information (like your CRM and e-commerce platform), you can build out robust profiles that help you deliver highly personalized emails.

From there, you can leverage information like name, demographic data, purchase history, etc., so your emails can instantly become much more relevant and engaging.


Campaign Monitor Integrations


Wondering how you can get started? Check out Campaign Monitor’s full list of integrations.


3. Use automation to boost relevancy.


Automated customer journeys are all about sending the right information at the right time, which is ultimately another form of personalization.


Emails that are triggered to send after a subscriber takes action or reaches an important milestone (like a spending threshold or membership renewal date) show that your brand is paying close attention to every customer.


Email Personalization – Automated Customer Journeys


The other benefit of using personalization this way is that it allows you to capture the momentum of important moments and turn them into moments for re-connection with your audience members. From birthdays to loyalty programs and beyond, the possibilities are endless when it comes to these opportunities for engagement and sales.


4. Pair with personalized landing pages.


Personalization that begins in an email should continue to flow to the next destination, like a landing page. Keep the forward momentum moving by building out personalized landing pages with tailored content based on the email that leads the subscriber to this point.


By keeping the attention focused on the message from your email, you can align the experience at the next destination for greater continuity. The entire journey is streamlined, and there’s less confusion about how the reader can keep following the path to conversion.


Wrap up


You’ve got the stats that show how personalization in email can produce impactful results for your brand (and you know the best practices for implementation, too.) All that’s left to do is to start creating your personalized email campaigns and testing to see which tactics work best for your audience. We think you’ll be impressed with the results.



Source: B2C

The Real Enemy

Skitterphoto / Pixabay


Your enemy isn’t pain.


The real enemy is when you don’t feel much of anything at all.


As a speaker, trainer and coach to high-performing big shots like you, I often find myself face-to-face with highly successful people who can’t seem to figure out why they are increasingly restless in the lives they’ve created for themselves.


On the one hand, you may genuinely enjoy the work you do, you’re compensated handsomely, hold an esteemed position in your work and community, and love/are loved by those around you.


Yet on the other hand you’re simply less interested in the life you’ve created for yourself. What once excited you, doesn’t as much anymore. Your highs aren’t all that high, your lows aren’t all that low. And you don’t know why.


Other than the occasional frustration or fleeting moment of happiness, you can’t escape the feeling that you’re not feeling much at all.


Yet you still want to protect the life you have.

And life isn’t painful enough yet to change.


So you remain…drifting into a future of More of the Same.


TRAPPED


This word keeps coming up over and over again when I’m with high performers: “Trapped.”


Sometimes it’s spoken explicitly. Other times, it’s lurking back there behind a façade of achievement, a quiet desperation that something is not quite right, you just don’t know what.


There’s a growing inner restlessness, the source of which eludes (and confounds) you. After all, you have so many reasons to be grateful, why would you ever feel discontent? Unsatisfied? Bored? Stuck? Or fearful?


Despite your resistance, these unspoken feelings persist.


‘Trapped’ is when you feel like you are living into a future of More of the Same.


Stagnation.

Lethargy.


Blah.


Bleh.


It’s a death sentence for someone like you. Nothing will extinguish your fire, your drive, or your ambition faster than the idea of living into a predictable, uninspiring future.


The Most Common Fantasy


Predictable, uninspiring futures are often the byproduct of a life lived in a perpetual state of busyness.


Life is moving so quickly that you don’t have a moment to catch your breath.


Your work is never done. You finish 1 thing only to have 20 other things waiting for you. Your inbox taunts you with that red notification label of mounting unread messages. You’ve heard of “inbox zero” but know it’s really just a fairy tale.


Your responsibilities at home are never done. There’s always someone else’s needs to take care of. A broken thing to fix. An errand to run. A to-do list that never seems to shrink.


After emptying your tank on everyone else, all you want to do is collapse into a couch and disappear into a stream of Netflix.


I can’t tell you how many of my clients have opened up to me in a moment of candor to reveal the same fantasy:


“I wish I could just go live on an island somewhere that no one wants or needs anything from me. I can escape. I can finally relax.”


One of my clients said he was ready to trade places with Tom Hanks’ character in Castaway. All he wanted was to be assured a couple of coconuts, Wilson (the volleyball and imaginary friend), and complete solitude.


When it takes 110% of what you’ve got simply to stay on the increasingly faster hamster wheel of life, no wonder you feel trapped.


There is Another Way


Now that I’ve held you under water long enough, it’s time to bring you up for some air.


What if you could design a future that you couldn’t wait to live into?


I’m talking about the kind of future where, when you envision it, there’s such a deep, burning sense of excitement to create a reality that it instantly inspires you in this moment, right now.


What if you could obliterate the “if I only had more time,” virus that’s infected you and 99.9% of those around you? What if you actually felt you were in command of your time, truly believed you had enough of it and could do precisely what you want to with it?


What if you could free yourself from your own limiting habits and fears? What if other people’s expectations and judgments slid off you like Teflon? What if you could walk your own path and not give a shit about what anyone else thinks?


When you can tap into that kind of feeling, it’s like taking some kind of limitless pill.


Your senses are heightened.


You become emboldened.


You act with urgency, intentionality and conviction.


Your mojo meter is on tilt.


Intrigued?


Take Command: Design Your Future


It’s time to break free from your self-imposed cage.


Command of your life is totally within your grasp. I know it because I changed my life, and I’ve seen my clients transform theirs through the same process.


You can harness your own power and Design a Future You Can’t Wait to Live into.


How?


The 3-step process is simple:


1. Awakening

Awakening is when you are ready to take action and make change. Awakenings occur through the cultivation of deep awareness. You cannot change what you are not aware of. The first stage is to uncover the habits that are operating in your blind spots. Once your habits are brought out into the light, you can inspect them, trace their origins and disrupt them.


2. Disrupting

Disrupting is the process of interrupting your perpetual patterns and breaking the stimulus and response cycle. When you do this, you get immediate and profound feedback on why you do what you do, and how these habits may be serving or oppressing you.


3. Designing

Once you’ve awakened to and disrupted your habits, you’ve broken the cycle. You’ve created space between stimulus and response. You can now consciously design new habits that empower your future.


This is your process for breaking free and take back life on your own terms. For abolishing the future of More of the Same.


The process is simple – but it won’t be easy.


Take Command.


Read the original article in Gloss magazine…



Source: B2C

How to Sell Your Amazon Business Quickly For The Highest Profit

E-Commerce sales are on the rise in 2017, according to the national retail federation e-commerce retail sales will grow by 8-12% in 2017. Driving a big part of this growth is Amazon and the fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) program. Amazon sellers are thriving with Amazon reporting a 70% increase in sellers using the FBA program in 2016.


Getting a business off the ground is hard work. It takes time, imagination and a great deal of sweat equity to build up something that makes you proud. When that business is humming along nicely, selling it can be smart. You’ll pull down the profits for all the hard work you did, and you’ll free up some time so you can work on the next big thing.


But you’ll want to make sure that you’re getting the right value for your business. And you don’t want the for-sale sign up for too long, or your sale might come with the subtle whiff of desperation.


There are a number of online marketplaces that specialize in selling Amazon businesses.


Here are four steps I’ve found most helpful when I’m trying to complete the sale of an internet business–and I want to protect my investment.



Step one: Figure out what your business is really worth.


Chances are, you have a ready answer when people ask you how much your business is worth. But is your answer verifiable by a third party?


The business loan market has been tightening since 2010, meaning that banks are requiring more and more paperwork before they’ll loosen purse strings. If you’re hoping to sell for a huge price, you’ll need to provide your buyer with the paperwork that justifies that price. Otherwise, it’s unlikely your buyer will get the needed loan.


Even if your buyer plans to use cash for the purchase, having a complete valuation is still a smart move. You’ll be able to justify your price and defend against lowballers when you have the paperwork in hand.


When selling an Amazon store there are a number of things that can affect your value. You should know your numbers and have information available on the following;


1) How many products are Amazon Best Sellers, and in what categories?


2) Does the business sell its own brand of products, others or a mix of both?


3) Does the business have multiple SKU’s and diversified revenue streams?


4) What is the company’s top and bottom line revenue growth rate?


5) How long has the company been active on the Amazon platform?


8) Does the company sell any products via FBA / Prime?


9) Does the company have other sales channels outside of Amazon?


Step two: Brush off your business plan and marketing kit.


So you can justify the value of your company right now. How can your buyer ensure continued success–and therefore a higher purchase price? Showing off a business plan and robust marketing materials can help.


Think of these tools as a way for your buyer to envision the future. By following the business plan you’ve already created and the marketing materials you’ve already developed, your buyer can simply take over from you and see the same level of success. It’s a tactic that’s sure to appease buyers worried about past performance and future profits. They can always improve on your old plans. But they have a roadmap to follow in the interim.


Step three: Reach out to people you know.


Do you have employees, vendors or customers who are interested in buying your business? You could turn to a stock solution, in which you’re selling your business to a group of interested parties. Or, you could simply tap one individual who might have the means (or the credit) to purchase the company outright.


A word of warning here: You might be tempted to give a price break to someone you know. After all, you might reason, these people know and love your company as much as you do. Selling to them might feel protective, as though you’re keeping your company in good hands.


Remember that you’re making a business decision here, and do your best to keep sentimentality out of the equation. The people you choose should have the assets needed to do the job right. If not, move on.


Step four: Connect with a trusted broker.


There are many steps involved in selling a business–even if you have a buyer already picked out. You have contracts to get through, agreements to set up and details to work out. Meanwhile, you need to keep your business up and running leading up to the sale.


A broker can be a huge ally during this process. Your broker can help to move the sale from concept to completion. And if the sale falls through, a broker will be able to lead you to a new buyer who will meet your needs a little better. If you’re even thinking about selling, now’s the time to connect with a broker you trust.


Selling a business isn’t about selling at the highest price, it’s about selling to the right buyer, for the right terms for the best price possible.


Worth the effort


Selling a business isn’t nearly as hard as building up a new company. But there is a little work involved, especially if you want to make money. By following these four steps, you’ll be well placed to complete the sale. Good luck!



Source: B2C

The Modern Small Business Owner [Infographic]

It’s no secret that small business owners have a lot on their minds, but what are they always thinking about? Small business owners often have concerns about their future, but for the most part they remain confident and optimistic. Here’s some information on the makeup on the modern small business owner.


Life of a Small Business Owner


Running a small business is no easy task. A nine to five workday often becomes a nine to nine as these entrepreneurs work late into the night on their ventures. However, more than a third of these business owners wouldn’t even consider working for anyone but themselves. Here are some statistics about what running a small business brings on:


  • Two times as much stress as maintaining a stable relationship.

  • Three times as much stress as raising children.

  • Four times as much stress as managing personal finances.

  • 57 percent of small business owners give up their free time on a regular basis.

  • 37 percent of small business owners consistently abandon their exercise in order to work.

  • 77 percent of small business owners say they are either “very” or “extremely” happy with what they do for a living.

What They Think About Their Business


Small business owners may not always have access to the most capital or financial experience, but they sure have the dedication. Here’s some information on how these entrepreneurs view themselves and the businesses they operate:


  • 71 percent of small business owners believe they have sufficient capital to run their business efficiently.

  • Only one in four business owners think they have the know-how to manage their own business finances.

  • 82 percent of small business owners expect better cash flow than their following year in business.

Nearly every small business owner is very adamant on keeping a steady and consistent cash flow. Entrepreneurs often seek out financial guidance from experts to help with growing problems such as late payments from clients. In fact, nearly eight out of ten business owners claim they’re having issues with late payments and four out of ten claim they have trouble every month. Here are some statistics on late payments:


  • 71 percent of small business owners follow up on late payments via email.

  • 63 percent of small businesses follow up on late payments by phone.

  • Less than 25 percent of small businesses have late payment penalties in place.

  • 12 percent of small businesses in the US accept mobile payments, but the number is steadily increasing.

When it comes to invoicing or billing clients, it’s always best to use an online invoicing platform. The majority of payments solutions and top payments companies provide a suite of financial products including digital invoicing. These platforms allow you to streamline your business finances so you can focus on growing your business.


What They Think About Their Country


Small business owners typically believe that the decisions they make affect their own personal financial well-being over the stability of the overall economy. This view of social and economic responsibility is especially popular among entrepreneurs aged 18 to 34, but national concerns are common amongst entrepreneurs of all ages. Here are the biggest national concerns among small business owners:


  • Effectiveness of U.S. government officials and policies

  • Oil and gas prices

  • Health care costs

  • Recovery of consumer spending

Overall small business owners are optimistic about the future of their business as well as their future as an entrepreneur. If you’re a small business owner or would like to know more about how they operate, feel free to reference this post and infographic at anytime!


the modern small business owner



Source: B2C

Friday, 18 August 2017

3 Easy Steps to Setting Up Facebook Dynamic Product Ads

Since our how to hack Facebook’s custom audiences for big payoffs post, we’ve had a lot of feedback from business owners wanting to know more about Facebook Dynamic Product Ads – or DPAs – and how they can cash in on the action. Why the big buzz? Facebook Dynamic Product Ads allow advertisers to dynamically generate product catalog ads and show specific product ads to specific users depending on which products they may be more interested in. Plus, with the use of lookalike audiences, you can find tons of potential shoppers who are interested in what you’re selling.


In other words, Facebook Dynamic Product Ads takes automated marketing to the next level, allowing online stores to target more accurately, automatically create highly relevant ads and tailor campaigns to where ad-viewers are in the sales funnel to get the timing just right for increased conversions. And unlike Google Shopping, advertisers don’t need to rely on and compete for small sets of keywords, as DPAs allow you to take remarketing to the next level as you target potential shoppers based on past actions and interest.


So, how do you get in on the action? These 3 easy steps to setting up Facebook Dynamic Product Ads will get you set up in no time.


how ti implement facebook product ads


Step 1: Creating Your Product Catalog


The first step is to set up your product catalogs. You can either do this by starting your first campaign as shown above, or by clicking on ‘all tools’ and selecting ‘Product catalogs.’



Then, you’ll be asked to name your catalog, list the type of product category and link it to a specific Facebook account page.



Next, import your product feed into Facebook, where you can either upload a file or create a schedule to download your products if they’re hosted online.


How to set up facebook dynamic product ads


‘Scheduled recurring uploads’ is where you will point to your dynamically-generated feed file by way of URL, and ‘Single upload’ is where you can add a .cdv file with all your product data.



If you’re opting for the latter, the next point is for you:


How to Create a Product Catalog .csv File


To create your .csv file, you will need to create a spreadsheet that includes the following information:


  • Product ID

  • Product Title

  • Price

  • Category

  • Description

  • Availability

  • Condition (New/Used)

  • Image Link

  • Link to Product Page


[Image Source]


Once you have inputted all the data above into your spread sheet, which should look like the table below, you’ll save it as a .csv file, ready to upload as explained above.


how to set up facebook dynamic product ads


Once you have inputted all the data above into your spread sheet, which should look like the table below, you’ll save it as a .csv file, ready to upload as explained above.


Step 2: Custom Audience Pixel Setup


As we learned from our hacking Facebook Custom Audiences for big payoffs, remarketing is an absolute must and without setting up your Facebook pixel, you’re dead in the water. If you’re thinking, “I’ve already set up my pixels,” don’t skip this thinking it is old news. For Facebook Dynamic Product Ads, there are three must-have data you will need and there is a chance you may still need to customize your audience pixel to include: AddToCart, Purchase and ViewContent.


This is pretty straightforward, and should already be implemented when you set up your pixel if you’re using integration or tag manager.


Faceboom dynamic product ad pixel setup


If you have set up your pixels manually, then you will need to adjust the code on your website and update your existing code.


Facebook pixel codes for dynamic product ads


[Image Source]


For those of you who are more tech savvy and opting to code yourself, head over to Facebook’s developer help pages for more details: Pixel setup guide for DA implementation.


Step 3: It’s Ad Template Setup Time


Facebook Dynamic product ad templates


[Image Source]


The last step, before launching your first Dynamic Product Ad campaign, is to set up your template. Facebook allows you to run either single- or multi-product DPAs and can be displayed on the right-hand column or in the Newsfeed and across all devices.


Facebook dynamic product carousel ads


You can see above that those tags will be replaced with the product name and descriptions from your product feeds. Once you have launched your campaign, your ads will automatically adjust based on your inventory and price changes, and as a big bonus, any customer who buys will be automatically removed from seeing any purchased products again.


Bonus Optimization Tricks


Yes, these are automated, but there are some tweaks you can do to get better Facebook Dynamic Product Ad results.


Don’t State Out of Stock


Instead, opt for ‘available for order’. This is because unlike Google Shopping, Facebook doesn’t assume you’re going to restock, so changing to ‘Available’ will prevent a sale being lost completely.


Include Price in Your Product Photos


Try including the price in the actual product photos. This can be particularly effective if you have a good-value product or are running a great sale.


example of ecommerce store using facebook dynamic product ads


Optimize Images


Test a few images until you have the best performing product shots. Ideally you will want to ensure your single-product ad images are 1,200×630 pixels while your multi-products are 600×600 pixels. Test between great product displays or showing people using your products to find the images that bring you the best CTRs.



There you have it: setting up Facebook Dynamic Product Ads is as easy as 1-2-3. If you’re still a little unsure, check out this podcast from Social Media Examiner below for a review. And if you are running ads but they are not performing as you want them to, try these must-do tips from our Facebook Ads Not Performing? Here are 7 Reasons Why post.



Source: B2C

Why Comparing the Number of Customers Year Over Year Isn’t Sufficient


How well do you know your customers?


Just knowing how many customers you have doesn’t tell you much. Do you have a clear picture of who your customers are and what they care about?


Take, for example, a politician who knows he or she has 10 million voters—but they don’t know the voters’ top concerns. Or, a doctor knowing how many patients she sees every year, yet unable to quantify the top three health issues people see him or her about. Or, a car dealership that sold 5,000 cars last year, but who doesn’t understand their clientele’s demographics.


We could go on, but hopefully you get the picture. Numbers don’t tell you too much without context or a story to go with it. The same goes for growth or decline. You may know you’ve grown, but do you know why? Likewise, do you understand why you may have lost customers this year versus last?


Your customers are more than a number.


Knowing more about your customers—other than how many you have—will become your superpower to better serving them and maintaining a competitive edge. You should be collecting enough data on your customers that you can craft a story about them and have a solid understanding of how they interact with your business. For example, you’ll want to know:


  • What They’re Buying. What specific products or services are they buying? And how much of it are they buying?

  • Frequency. How often are they making a purchase? How often are they engaging with your business, either through your website or visiting your store?

  • Shopping Habits. How are they shopping – in person, via desktop or from their phone?

  • Customer Satisfaction. Do you have an idea of their satisfaction level? For example, have they completed surveys, or can you tell if they’ve referred you to a friend?

  • Marketing Effectiveness. How are they responding to your marketing programs? Do they prefer email marketing versus print ads? How are they interacting with your display campaigns?

  • Their Personas. Can you paint a picture of what your customers may look like? Roughly how old are they? Are they male or female? What do they care about and where do they spend their time?

It’s all about the context.


At a glance, seeing your customer base grow is a good thing. Much like how many marketers view website traffic, it’s an instinctive response to welcome a larger number year-over-year. Growth is a great starting point!


However, without understanding what is driving that growth, or how your customers view you and spend their time (and money) with your business, you might as well be staring at meaningless digits. Make the effort to understand all the complexities behind that year-over-year number so that you can arm yourself with the data you need to make smart decisions and thrive.


Business intelligence dashboards make this ongoing effort painless, since you’re able to collect information, couple it with context, and view it instantly.



Source: B2C

4 Use Cases for Personalizing Emails at Open Time

personalizing emails at open time


According to the Radicati Group, 269 billion emails are sent and received every day. While there are certainly other channels marketers can use to reach customers, 72% of consumers indicate that they still prefer email as their main method of communication. And, of course, email remains a relatively low-cost method of communication that marketers can use to build and maintain relationships with customers.


So despite the inbox overload, email remains a key channel for marketers. That’s why relevancy is so critical. Irrelevant emails are easy to ignore. But a relevant email has a better chance at standing out among the clutter. There are several ways to be relevant to recipients, but one key method is to ensure that emails are relevant at open time, rather than send time. This ensures that the decision of what content to display in the email is based on up-to-the-moment information. This information includes anything that may have changed based on a recipient’s behavior, intent, preferences or affinities, or with the content itself. In this blog post, I’ll describe some examples.


1. Avoid suggesting an action a person has already taken


One of the most important reasons for emails to be relevant at open time is that between when an email is sent and when it is opened, a person can take additional actions that make certain CTAs or messages outdated for the individual. You never want to recommend a product in an email that someone has just purchased, for example, because that makes it look like you do not know the person very well (and it is a missed opportunity to recommend something else instead).


This situation can occur outside of retail as well. Let’s say that a technology provider has an onboarding flow of emails that it sends to new users. The first CTA in the email may contain a message asking the user to download the app. But if a user has already taken that action, the email should instead offer a new CTA when the email is opened — such as asking the user to invite her colleagues to use the solution.


personalizing emails at open time


2. Leverage up-to-date intent or preferences


A person’s behaviors with your brand or company can also be a clue into that person’s intent or preferences, which can change between when the email is sent and when it is opened. For example, a shopper on a retail site may have originally demonstrated a strong affinity for the shoe category. But later, when he returned to the site, he may have spent more time checking out jeans and even put a pair in his shopping cart. While the retailer’s original product recommendations in an email may have focused solely on shoes, after he demonstrates an intent to purchase jeans, recommendations for appropriate jeans should be incorporated as well.


For more information about using behavioral data to uncover a person’s preferences and intent, check out this blog post.


3. Display updated information


Beyond individual relevance, some businesses have information that changes regularly. Those types of businesses should ensure that any emails update in real time so that when customers click through to the site, they aren’t confused by conflicting information. For example, consider betting odds that global gaming sites regularly publish. Odds can change by the minute, and gaming sites should make sure that the odds they send to customers are updated the second the email is opened so they are always accurate.


Another example of content that is constantly changing are fundraising efforts. The distance from the goal can impact the type of message within the email. For example, if a company is far from reaching its fundraising goal, the content could ask recipients to donate and then share on social media to increase awareness. But if it is close to the goal, the message can change to indicate how the company just needs a little bit more to meet its goal. When the content updates in real time, the fundraising efforts can be reflected accurately and relevant messaging can be paired with it.


personalizig emails at open time


4. Include accurate prices


Finally, price changes can be reflected when emails are updated at open time. For example, if a product is on sale when the email is originally sent, but not on sale when the email is ultimately opened, the recipient could become confused or angry when she clicks through to the website to find that the price is higher than she expected. Alternatively, if a price drops between when an email is sent and when it is opened, it can be an even better incentive for the recipient to click through. In both cases, the price can be displayed accurately with open-time updates.


Final Thoughts


Ensuring that emails are relevant at open time is a key aspect of email personalization.


To help marketers boost clickthrough and conversion rates, Megan Knisely and T.J. Prebil, Customer Success Manager and Director of Product Marketing, respectively, presented the webinar, 5 Ways Personalization Improves Email Marketing Results. In this webinar, they walk through the importance of open-time email personalization and going beyond just personalizing the first_name field. Watch the webinar replay for their insights.




Source: B2C

Need More Email Addresses? There’s a Hack For That!

Need More Email Addresses? There’s a Hack For That!


For the multi-tasking solopreneur, one email address is never enough. But setting-up and managing multiple accounts is a time-suck you could live without.


With Gmail, you can have your cake and eat it too.


How to Create Unlimited Addresses in Gmail


Use your domain-based email addresses (i.e., you@yourdomain.com) for business. For everything else – road-testing software, registering for free webinars, you name it – use a Gmail address.


When one isn’t enough, add a “+” sign and then add other characters after the “+”.


For example, if your regular Gmail address is yourname@gmail.com, use any of these…


  • yourname+test1@gmail.com

  • yourname+softwaresubscription@gmail.com

  • yourname+whatever@gmail.com

To Gmail, these are all the same. To any site where you have to sign up or register, they are all different. Why is that so great?


It’s particularly useful when signing up for free offers…


Put a company’s name (ex., “supersoftware”) after the “+” to find out if it spams. When you see email coming from a business that you don’t know, and if they are sending it to yourname+supersoftware@gmail.com, you know that “supersoftware” sold your account! Report it to…


  • abuse@supersoftware.com (or whatever their domain is)

The beauty of this approach is that you can create an infinite number of addresses and have them all arrive in your Gmail inbox!


Another important use? Use them as disposable addresses to take back total control of your email..


You Can Also Filter Unwanted Messages!


Finished testing that software? No longer want to receive messages from that company? Most folks click the “Unusubscribe” link. But what if they don’t obey? Or what if you later change your mind and want to catch up on missed emails?


“Gmail Unlimited” offers you many useful options. For example…


To stop receiving email from “test2” (an account you set up to test a product), set up a filter to direct these messages to the trash (or anywhere you like). Here’s how…


1) Open your Gmail and click on the down arrow in the search box at the top…


Need More Email Addresses? There’s a Hack For That!


2) Add the customized email address (yourname+test 2@gmail.com) to the “To” box, then click “Create filter with this search”…


Need More Email Addresses? There’s a Hack For That!


3) Select the action you want Google to take (“Delete” in this case) and create the filter…


Need More Email Addresses? There’s a Hack For That!


If you figure that you may want to catch up on posts by a blogger at some point, choose to store these in a folder instead. The options here make “Gmail Unlimited” super-useful!


Bottom Line Takeaway?


Time is the most precious resource you have. Don’t waste it on needless tasks like managing multiple email addresses. Instead…


  1. Set up a “Gmail variation” whenever you need a different address.

  2. Filter it (usually to the trash) when you’re through.

Oh, and if you’re worried about what Gmail thinks of this hack… they suggested it on their official blog!


Since time is the commodity you have the least of when operating as a solopreneur, be diligent about freeing more of it up. Use these 3 simple hacks (in addition to the email hack above) to create more time for your business.



Source: B2C

Who are you Targeting? How to Create a Customer Profile

 


What is a customer profile?


Believe it or not, a customer profile is an important part of your brand’s identity. It is a detailed description of your ideal customer including where they live, their personality, their dreams and frustrations, and even where they are gathering information.


Think about your favorite customer. They are most likely someone who you generally enjoy doing business with, who is loyal to your company and refers additional people to your business. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could have more customers exactly like them? A customer profile can assist in doing just that!


Why is it important to have a customer profile?


A customer profile can help you create content that targets people exactly like your ideal customer. Each time you are producing content or answering the phone, you will have a detailed description to help guide you to speak in a way that grabs their attention and fulfills their needs.


A customer profile can also help speed up the process of creating content and aid in maintaining voice throughout your various types and mediums. Because the process of creating a customer profile requires you to dive deeper into what influences your customer you will better understand what your customers’ needs are and how your business can fulfill those better than your competition!


How do I collect information to create a customer profile?


Gathering enough information to create a customer profile may take some time. When working with our clients we use a 9-question exercise to gather what we can about our client’s customer. Since we don’t have direct access to their customer, this Persona Exercise helps us gather as much information as we can.


If you have direct access to the customers, you can use a customer survey to gather more detailed information. When creating a survey, you will want to gather information about your customer, their preferences, their thought and feelings about your industry and your business without being too intrusive. You can create a survey using tools like Google Forms or Survey Monkey to send out to your customers. Be sure to keep it short! Use the example survey below to gather ideas about the types of questions you should be asking.


Creating the profile document.


Once you’ve gathered enough information about your customer we recommend combining it all into a document. We use a template when creating our customer profile documents and are happy to share that with you here! If possible, we like to include a headshot of the customer so that you can picture who exactly you are talking to when drafting content.


Your customer profile is a vital tool in maintaining consistency throughout your company’s brand. We highly recommend printing it out and keeping it handy to help you create strong content. In order to obtain more ideal customers, your content needs to be written in away that it will attract them.



Source: B2C

6 Things to Know About FTC Influencer Marketing Rules

Influencer marketing works well in terms of celebrity social media partnerships. In fact the Federal Trade Commission is wary of these posts fitting in a little too seamlessly. There are enormous benefits to influencer marketing as we all know. But like blogs there is some regulatory framework to wade through. Several companies and dozens of influencers have come under fire in the past few months for deceptive influencer advertising. Learn what you should and shouldn’t do to keep your own brand out of hot water.


A Guide to FTC influencer marketing rules and regulations


Read these 6 points to make sure your next influencer marketing campaign doesn’t catch the attention of the wrong people.


  1. Not all product reviews require disclosure. And that’s because not all product reviews are endorsements. If your campaign doesn’t involve a transfer of funds or something of value from the company to the influencer or their audience it is not a paid advertisement. From the company’s side this is the ideal scenario. But accomplishing it in reality is tough especially with anyone above the level of micro-influencer. One case where a disclosure is often unnecessary is if it is broadly understood that someone is a spokesperson for a brand. Stephen Curry has a shoe deal with Under Armour. If he posts about the company his followers can be reasonably expected to know about his relationship to UA. It’s likely no disclosure is necessary. Now, here’s a random Stephen Curry video to make this post more interesting.

    Okay, now back to important but boring stuff. Keep in mind however there’s no objective threshold for the definition of broad awareness so it’s smart to err on the safe side.


  2. Anything you get or give away for free qualifies as a sponsored partnership. Free has a different definition here. Anything influencers are paid to use, items that they are given for free or giveaways that influencers are paid to distribute need disclosure. It doesn’t have to be the influencer who ultimately benefits either. If anyone ends up taking home some free merchandise via sweepstakes or giveaway the influencer has to disclose the sponsor of the contest.

  3. Sponsored posts have to be easily recognizable: A large part of the FTC’s crackdown on Instagram influencer marketing boiled down to something they called deceptive marketing. All that was required of an influencer before this change to demonstrate sponsored content was to post a #ad, #sp, or a similar hashtag anywhere within the post. The meaning of a vague two-letter hashtag buried in a post – possibly among a string of other hashtags – is not entire obvious. The FTC decided to crack down on ads that deliberately muddy the paid nature of the post by trying to hide the sponsorship. To avoid fines or worse, bad PR, try the following:
    • Acknowledge the sponsor at the beginning of a video

    • Include a #Ad at the beginning of the post

    • Use Instagram’s custom sponsor subheading to acknowledge the sponsorship in an understated way.

    • Just note that “Brand X gave me product Y to try” as part of the text.


  4. You’re responsible for what your influencers post. Pleading ignorance won’t get you anywhere with the FTC. It’s your burden as a business to make sure that your influencers comply with FTC influencer marketing rules and regulations, because a failure to do so will land you in as much trouble as the influencer. Your influencers may not be particularly experienced with the practice of posting sponsored content. You should present them with a clear guide of what they’re supposed to convey in a post. Educate your influencers on what they have to do so that they aren’t dragged into legal trouble which could mean a crisis for your brand. And check in periodically to make sure every post is following FTC influencer marketing rules. Keep in mind that microinfluencers in particular may be new to the game and need a some education.

  5. Influencers have to actually try a product before endorsing it. Don’t pay someone to spout a canned – or even false – statement about the usefulness of a product.
    If an influencer hasn’t actually experienced a product, they are not allowed to make any public statement regarding it. Likewise, if an influencer ends up disliking your product you cannot continue with the partnership as if they enjoyed the product. This kind of deceitful behavior intentionally misleads consumers and is decisively illegal.

  6. There’s still a long way to go until everyone follows the rules. The FTC has a lot on its plate. Noncompliance is still rampant. A recent Consumer Media study reported over 90% of sponsored posts of celebrities are not disclosed. That means there is some big money to be made on fines. The FTC will get involved when they notice a pattern of misleading content or a particularly egregious case of a concealed sponsorship.

But it doesn’t matter how hard or easy it is to get caught. An FTC infraction is bad for your brand. Put in your best effort to stay within FTC influencer marketing rules and regulations. It could keep you out of big trouble.



Source: B2C

Thursday, 17 August 2017

6 Things to Know About FTC Influencer Marketing Rules

Influencer marketing works well in terms of celebrity social media partnerships. In fact the Federal Trade Commission is wary of these posts fitting in a little too seamlessly. There are enormous benefits to influencer marketing as we all know. But like blogs there is some regulatory framework to wade through. Several companies and dozens of influencers have come under fire in the past few months for deceptive influencer advertising. Learn what you should and shouldn’t do to keep your own brand out of hot water.


A Guide to FTC influencer marketing rules and regulations


Read these 6 points to make sure your next influencer marketing campaign doesn’t catch the attention of the wrong people.


  1. Not all product reviews require disclosure. And that’s because not all product reviews are endorsements. If your campaign doesn’t involve a transfer of funds or something of value from the company to the influencer or their audience it is not a paid advertisement. From the company’s side this is the ideal scenario. But accomplishing it in reality is tough especially with anyone above the level of micro-influencer. One case where a disclosure is often unnecessary is if it is broadly understood that someone is a spokesperson for a brand. Stephen Curry has a shoe deal with Under Armour. If he posts about the company his followers can be reasonably expected to know about his relationship to UA. It’s likely no disclosure is necessary. Now, here’s a random Stephen Curry video to make this post more interesting.

    Okay, now back to important but boring stuff. Keep in mind however there’s no objective threshold for the definition of broad awareness so it’s smart to err on the safe side.


  2. Anything you get or give away for free qualifies as a sponsored partnership. Free has a different definition here. Anything influencers are paid to use, items that they are given for free or giveaways that influencers are paid to distribute need disclosure. It doesn’t have to be the influencer who ultimately benefits either. If anyone ends up taking home some free merchandise via sweepstakes or giveaway the influencer has to disclose the sponsor of the contest.

  3. Sponsored posts have to be easily recognizable: A large part of the FTC’s crackdown on Instagram influencer marketing boiled down to something they called deceptive marketing. All that was required of an influencer before this change to demonstrate sponsored content was to post a #ad, #sp, or a similar hashtag anywhere within the post. The meaning of a vague two-letter hashtag buried in a post – possibly among a string of other hashtags – is not entire obvious. The FTC decided to crack down on ads that deliberately muddy the paid nature of the post by trying to hide the sponsorship. To avoid fines or worse, bad PR, try the following:
    • Acknowledge the sponsor at the beginning of a video

    • Include a #Ad at the beginning of the post

    • Use Instagram’s custom sponsor subheading to acknowledge the sponsorship in an understated way.

    • Just note that “Brand X gave me product Y to try” as part of the text.


  4. You’re responsible for what your influencers post. Pleading ignorance won’t get you anywhere with the FTC. It’s your burden as a business to make sure that your influencers comply with FTC influencer marketing rules and regulations, because a failure to do so will land you in as much trouble as the influencer. Your influencers may not be particularly experienced with the practice of posting sponsored content. You should present them with a clear guide of what they’re supposed to convey in a post. Educate your influencers on what they have to do so that they aren’t dragged into legal trouble which could mean a crisis for your brand. And check in periodically to make sure every post is following FTC influencer marketing rules. Keep in mind that microinfluencers in particular may be new to the game and need a some education.

  5. Influencers have to actually try a product before endorsing it. Don’t pay someone to spout a canned – or even false – statement about the usefulness of a product.
    If an influencer hasn’t actually experienced a product, they are not allowed to make any public statement regarding it. Likewise, if an influencer ends up disliking your product you cannot continue with the partnership as if they enjoyed the product. This kind of deceitful behavior intentionally misleads consumers and is decisively illegal.

  6. There’s still a long way to go until everyone follows the rules. The FTC has a lot on its plate. Noncompliance is still rampant. A recent Consumer Media study reported over 90% of sponsored posts of celebrities are not disclosed. That means there is some big money to be made on fines. The FTC will get involved when they notice a pattern of misleading content or a particularly egregious case of a concealed sponsorship.

But it doesn’t matter how hard or easy it is to get caught. An FTC infraction is bad for your brand. Put in your best effort to stay within FTC influencer marketing rules and regulations. It could keep you out of big trouble.



Source: B2C

How to Write For A B2B Audience in 2017

Free-Photos / Pixabay


Writing is writing, right? And compelling copy always converts, no matter the audience, right?


No, not really.


There’s a massive difference between writing for B2C and B2B audiences – because the audiences themselves are quite different.


Here are just a few ways how:


  • B2B audiences are less varied – in terms of preferences, demographics, desires, and pain points. B2C audiences can come from anywhere, but B2B ones are usually purchasing decision-makers in an organization.

  • ‘Fun’ isn’t as important in B2B – B2C audiences respond to humor, fun and creativity. With B2B, the message is more important than the humor.

  • B2B audiences have fewer channels to find your message – B2C audiences are happy to take a look at content on social media, radio, TV and a multitude of channels. There’s evidence, however, that B2B audiences still tend to be hard to reach, relatively time-poor, and clustered around membership networks and online communities.

  • B2B audiences purchase less frequently – You need to be aware that ther e is a process of consideration, comparison and due diligence to get through. There are few impulse purchases in the B2B world, so a play to emotion isn’t going to work.

With this in mind, let’s jump into some easy ways that messages can be tailored to gain valuable B2B eyeballs, and spark better conversions.


What’s the Pain Point?


This is the right place to start your investigation. Find out why B2B audiences want to buy your product.


What problem are they suffering that your brand can alleviate?


Once you’ve figured out what problem your audience wants help with, knit answers into your copy. If you’re writing about air-conditioning disinfecting technology, don’t lead with “Cutting-edge technology.” Instead, try something like “20% fewer sick days for your business – proven.”


Takeaway: B2B audiences are motivated by specific pain points, not by the desire to consume.


What Benefits Are You Bringing to the Table?


This is an extension of the last point. B2B audiences are focused on benefits.


There’s no such thing as an impulse buy here: Examine what makes your value proposition unique.


Is it the customer service? The reliability? The fact that it streamlines business processes? List those benefits clearly, loud and proud.


Takeaway: B2B audiences are buying to boost their business. So let them know how you can help in your copy.


Keep it Simple


Remember how we discussed that B2B audiences tend to be time-poor? They don’t have the bandwidth to wade through reams of clever copy. So let’s get to the point without too many twists and turns along the way.


If you’ve written five great paragraphs, see if you can shrink that message into one power-packed paragraph instead. Simplicity is the one trick to higher conversions.


Something along the lines of “Want to bring down logistics costs? Truber puts you in touch with truckers in the area for fast and efficient road haulage with full tracking and transparency.”


Get their attention fast, and move them to the next step.


Takeaway: B2B audiences are time-poor. They’re not going to wade through text. Convince them early.


Understand Their Language


Good copywriters hate jargon. They’re not alone.


Jargon tends to obfuscate and confuse. It complicates simple statements. I actively encourage writers to not hide behind a wall of linguistic excess.


But jargon is also a shared language for B2B audiences. It helps them speed up internal communication, and refer to very specific things easily.


Using terms we consider jargon is how they speak on the job – and how they’ll search for your client’s product on Google. Not knowing their language will make your words seem unconvincing.


Worse, it might mean that your client’s website just doesn’t show up in search results, and your words are never seen.


There’s a fine line between too much jargon, and not knowing how your audience speaks. Learn how they refer to key products and services, and speak a little like them.


Takeaway: Too much jargon is bad. But not knowing the specific language your B2B audience relies on can leave you out in the cold.


Remember Mobile


“Businesses don’t buy on mobile,” goes popular advice. Maybe, but many B2B buyers will search for solutions on mobile first, while they’re away from their desk.


The average time spent on mobile has hit around 3 hours a day. Increasingly, people are treating mobile phones as their primary platform. Yet, B2B conversion rates are low.


Yes, there are barriers to B2B conversions on mobile – forms, payments, registrations and so on are all difficult on a smaller screen. But better copy for smaller screens can help.


The trick is to get your potential client to make the transition from mobile to the desktop at work. And clever copy can entice them to do that.


To do this adeptly, keep your copy short, succinct, and easy to read on smaller screens. Go the route of more bullet points and breaks, and fewer dense chunks of text.


Follow up with a great call to action – perhaps a demo sign-up, or a reminder to schedule a call when at work – to seal the deal.


Takeaway: Even if B2B audiences don’t buy on mobile, they’re likely to encounter your copy on mobile first. Make your text mobile-friendly.



Source: B2C

Protect Yourself From “Bad” Clients With This Sales Agreement Language

Sales agreement language may be the only way to protect yourself from unruly clients once they’re in your portfolio. What I’ve found is that there aren’t really “bad” clients, just uneducated clients. But if for some reason things go sour, strong language in your sales agreement may be your only saving grace. Here’s how to protect yourself.


sales-agreement-language


“Bad” Clients


Using the term “bad client” may conjure up Maleficent, but it’s not as if clients set out to be evil or malicious (at least ours don’t).



via GIPHY


I used to work with someone who had many “bad” clients. Eventually, I realized this person was the problem more so than the clients; the lesson here is to remove the phrase “bad clients” from your vocabulary (maybe save it for clients who don’t pay).


Our Substandard Client Example:


Client A and Client B are both clients, and both make soap. While Client A makes every single weekly call, comes armed with feedback on reports and ideas for upcoming campaigns, Client B rarely makes their calls. In fact, they usually answer emails days or weeks later when we ask for critical campaign information or updates. Which client do you think would have more success with an outsourced social media management partner?


If you said Client A … ding ding ding! What we’ve found over and over again is that clients who make the weekly meetings almost ALWAYS see the most success. Therefore, we felt we needed to underscore the importance of what it means to be a “good” — successful! — client with our company.


Client education goes a long way with curing “bad” clients, and this includes using your sales agreement language as an educational moment.


Using Sales Agreement Language To Educate Your Clients


For us, our partnership means everything and is paramount to show our success.


To help educate clients like Client B in the example above, we added language in our sales agreement that looks similar to this:


“Meetings and client input play a vital role in the success of your service agreement with [YOUR COMPANY]. Please make every attempt to notify your Account Manager when calls will be missed and plan for a rescheduled time to talk. Regularly missing meetings by [CLIENT NAME] may result in the non-renewal or termination of your agreement. Our success relies heavily on having a dedicated partner within your company.”


If meetings, or brand assets, or any other element of the partnership or relationship is crucial to you being able to succeed, make sure you have language in your sales agreement that will highlight this point and protect you.


Other Sales Agreement Saviors


There are two other places I often hear entrepreneurs lamenting about their clients:


  • Slow or no pays

  • Scope creep

Try the below language examples in your sales agreement for payment issues and/or scope creep.


Slow/No Pays


Spell it out when it comes to slow or no-pays.


“Invoices for ongoing services are sent [when you send invoices] and payment is due upon receipt. A 2% late fee will be assessed for payments received after the 5th of the month. All account services will be stopped if no payment has been made by the 10th of the month, and will not resume until payment and late fees are paid in full. Services not rendered due to nonpayment are not the responsibility of [YOUR COMPANY] to make up to the client.”


Scope Creep


Clients often decide they want more work, which is GREAT! However, make sure your sales agreement outlines how that new work will be accepted.


“We’re happy to make changes to the project scope with [CLIENT NAME] request at any time, but please know these additions are subject to additional billing and a signed addenda outlining the new scope of work.


At the end of the day, it’s easier to point to your signed agreement when snafus pop up than it is to try to enforce invisible rules.


There Are No “Bad” Clients!


There are very few cases where clients have actually been considered “bad” — refusing to pay for services rendered is awful.


It’s your job as an entrepreneur or sales associate to educate your clients on your partnership and processes.


How do you protect yourself from unwanted client behavior? Let us know in the comments section below!



Source: B2C

Online Ad Creation

We’ve all seen them, those ads that are small and sometimes inconspicuous. I’m talking about the ads that show up on mobile websites in banners or small sidebars. They may be trying to tell you something, but sometimes can be confusing. Often, this is the result of the focus shifting to what they look like, rather than what they’re intended for. This can be a problem on your ads objective.


There are many studies that show how to create online ads in order to entice potential customers to click on them. Sometimes these practices may feel wrong or just not look as pretty. To be truthful, that’s ok. I’m not advocating for a bad design. However, I am talking about optimizing your advertising for conversion.


One tool to use to create online ads is Photoshop. I say that because I happen to have a creative cloud account and I’m a little biased. I know there are many other apps out there and third party services. But if you’re paying $50 a month for creative cloud I’d go with Photoshop.


Create a Photoshop template (PSD). There your template contains all the ad sizes you need. In the template, each layer is a shape that is the exact size of that ad. And is a smart object. Within that smart object, it will open up a new file (PSB). There you make your ad. See below screenshots of Photoshop or click here for tutorial:




I know that sounds complicated. But I’ll supply a link below to Adobe and you can see how this works, and it’s fantastic. Adobe layers will accept file extensions (layer1.jpg). And by using the “image processor” output that file the folder. There is no more need to save each individual layer out or to save out the entire file as a JPEG or file you require.



https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/generate-assets-layers.html


The other obstacle is to create more than one ad. Often we think we make one set of ads to the different sizes we need. For the devices, we will place them on (placement). But that’s not the end of the ad creation.


Ad sets


In an ad set there are up to 2 to 4 different types of ads. All at the sizes required for the placements that you need for your campaign. In the campaign can be multiple ad sets. To have only one set of ads limits your ability to see how effective your ads are in your overall campaigns effectiveness.


So that is how ads are made. However, the main reason of this post is why we make ads the way we make them.


Click Thrus


I sure you’ve heard the term “click through rate” (CTR). While it may sound like a fancy marketing term it actually is a very simple term describing what users do when they click on ad and land on a destination.


Ads must be enticing and they must grab attention. Moreover, be very clear as to what they are about and the destination you’re taking the user to. This is not easy to do in a space smaller than your finger. That said, you can see why being concerned about what an ad looks like versus how an ad will perform can sometimes be a personal struggle.


Different Types of Ads


There are different file types we typically generate for online ad creation. The first type is a simple JPG. This type is a simple image. Just as you would take with a camera. The next is a GIF. Pronounced as “Jiff,” like the peanut butter, but there is debate that it is also pronounced GIF with a hard “g.” This file type allows for simple animation. Remember, more animation equals more layers, thus larger the file (NOT good). The final file type is HTML5, but that’s for another post.


In creating a JPG of an ad it’s important to remember 3 important things to go into that ad.


1) Make the focal point something recognizable that has to do with the campaign.


If you are advertising a wedding, then you should show wedding rings or preferably a bride. This is because it’s a person with a face. I would personally opt for the bride because people like faces. It attracts more to the eye in order to get the ad to be clicked.


2) Next is a very clear message on what the ad is.


Ads must be done with as few words as possible. Again, you are creating something that is no bigger than your finger. I know that a pretty ad is what seems best. It creates delight in the user and interest, but there is a negative to this. If you’re not careful, delightful details can hurt the usability of your product. It can go as far as the user being too distracted, and thus your ad is now useless to get those coveted click thrus. Also, delight detailed design doesn’t scale because of your audience, but more on that in another blog post on UX Design.


3) Finally, the call to action (CTA)


To be effective, this has be clear. Hopefully, the message on it is more inviting than “click here.” If you take a look at the email marketing service MailChimp, they’ve got calls to action down. Words like “onward” or “rock on” are pervasive in their service. These terms are a part of UX Design to evoke emotional response to their brand. These kinds of CTA words reflect your brands tone, but also these calls to action words create a feel that a real human is behind the ad.


5 Ad Design styles that work


1) Doutone


Duotone is a halftone reproduction of an image that brings out its middle tones and highlights.



2) Minimalistic


In a overcrowded Internet where everybody wants to get noticed, this is another design style that can help your banner ad stand out on the internet and also make the user click.



3) Pastels


They are also described as “soothing”, “soft”, “neutral”, “washed out” or “desaturated”, lacking strong chromatic content.



4) Vivid Colors


Vivid is an adjective that describes an adventurous and bright color, a powerful feeling, or an image in your mind that is so clear you can almost touch it.


The word “vivid” comes from the Latin “vivere” which means “to live”.


So, to make it more clear – vivid is something intense. These are ads with intense color.




5) Simply Native Photos


My favorite because as I stated earlier, people like to look at faces. But take note “how” the photos are taken and shown. Perspective shots draw the eye, and the users are more likely to take interest and click. I bet the ad in the lower corner had you looking over to what the surfer girl was looking at. Models in photos can help draw attention to products or part of the ad by the direct they are looking at.



Coca-Cola is another great example of how to use Native Photos in your banner ads.



Conclusion


As the online adverting space becomes more crowded with messaging, we want to make sure that your message remains clear and can be heard above the noise. Hopefully, after reading this you have some better ideas on how to make sure your message is clear and your customers know exactly what you offer, and most importantly, how to contact you.


What do you think of our article, was it helpful? Did we miss anything? Let us know in the comments below.



Source: B2C